Tag Archives: growl

Recommended Software for your Avid

This is just a list of the software that I install on any Mac that I’m working on, Avids included.

  • Alfred: easy keyboard-based application and macro access. I used to use Quicksilver but development on it stalled
  • Growl: provides nice, discreet notifications for software running in the background (email checkers, FTP clients, my Automator backup script)
  • jEdit: full-featured free text editor, since TextEdit is a joke. jEdit also supports regular expression search/replace, which has saved me countless hours over the years. bbEdit, TextMate, or similar are also good options.
  • Chrome : I like Chrome for my browser, but FYI Avid’s manual doesn’t work in it, so sometimes I have to open Safari.
  • Quicktime Pro : Probably being phased out, but still useful if you have the choice.
  • DVD Studio Pro: Easy and full-featured DVD creation, but not available for purchase any longer. Hope you bought Final Cut Studio before FCPX came out.
  • Name Mangler, or similar file renaming software. This lets you rename a batch of files according to regular expressions, numeric sequences, and other conditions.
  • Dropbox : Great for putting your Avid project into if you’re a one-man show. On bigger shows with multiple Editorial locations I use it to pass individual bins back and forth between myself and other assistant editors

Automating Avid Project Backups

REVISED 9/23/09: Rewrote for Leopard

The Importance of Backing Up

The most important part of an Avid project is, of course, the project directory. Media can be replaced, albeit tediously, but your project directory cannot. Therefore, it is not only important that you back up your project daily, but that you also take it with you when you leave for the night. Simply copying the project from one workspace to another is not sufficient, nor is just copying it to your local Avid drive. If a disk or two fails on the Unity and the only copy of the project you have is there, you’re probably screwed. If there’s a fire and both your Unity and your desktop Avid burn up, you’re definitely screwed. The number one rule of making backups is that the two copies must be geographically separated. I cannot stress that enough.

Thankfully, it’s easy and painless to do this, and you can automate it. It doesn’t matter whether you use a PC or Mac, you can automate it on either platform. But for the purposes of this tutorial, and since I’m pretty solidly in the Mac user base now, I like to use Automator and Growl (both Mac-only). To download my Automator script, click the link at the bottom of this post.

Automator

The process of creating an Automator workflow to back up your Avid project is fairly simple. The process I’ve chosen involves syncing the Avid project directory on the Unity to a copy of it on your Avid’s desktop, creating a zip file of the desktop copy, and then transferring that to a USB drive. It requires five actions, which are these:

  1. Run a Shell Script

    Don't forget to change this command to your own project directory and desktop folders!

    • This command runs the program rsync, with the arguments “-avP” to provide directory recursion (so it will copy all subdirectories of your project directory), copy almost everything while maintaining file attributes, and be verbose about what it’s doing (which is good if you run this command manually from the Terminal, but won’t have an affect in Automator). The command is as follows:
    • rsync -avP --delete --exclude "*.log" --exclude "~avid_remove*" --exclude ".DS_Store" --delete-excluded /Volumes/Project/YOUR_PROJECT /Users/YOUR_USER/Desktop
    • The “–delete” argument tells rsync to delete any files on your local directory that do not exist on the Unity. So if you delete a bin on the Unity, it will make sure that bin is removed from your local drive, too.
    • The “–exclude” arguments tell rsync NOT to back up any files that match *.log, ~avid_remove, or .DS_Store in their filenames
    • The –delete-excluded argument tells rsync to delete any files in your backup directory that do not exist in your project folder, including files that have been excluded above, if for some reason there are any in your backup directory
    • The reason I use rsync instead of just re-copying the entire Avid project folder to the desktop and overwriting yesterday’s copy is that when your project directory gets to be several GB in size, it is much quicker and just as thorough to copy only the files that have changed since your last backup. Otherwise you end up recopying a bunch of bins that haven’t changed since months ago, and that takes time.
  2. Get Specified Finder Items
    • Once rsync finishes, this command runs to tell Automator where your backup directory is.Get Finder Items (Leopard)
  3. Create Archive
    • This action takes your desktop Project directory, and creates a zip file out of it. You want to do this because bin files (.avb) are highly compressible, meaning that you can take your 2GB project directory and compress it down to a couple hundred MBs.
    • In the “Save as:” text box, you can see I’m telling Automator that I want my zip file to be named with a variable for today’s date, such as “Warrior.90922.zip” and that I want it saved to the Desktop.

    Create Archive (Leopard)

    My Automator variable that inserts today's date. Rearrange the parts of the date however you like. I choose this method so Finder sorts my backups chronologically.

  4. Copy Finder Items
    • This action takes your newly minted zip file and copies it to your flash drive.
    • N.B. Plug your flash drive in before running this workflow. If you don’t, Automator will fail, but if you do then you can leave and come back in 10 minutes to a fully backed up project already on your flash drive.
    • Copy to Flash Drive (Leopard)

  5. Show Growl Notification (optional)
    • This step allows you to display a Growl notification once the backup has completed. I find this useful because I can go make some tea while Automator is running and see at a glance when I come back if it’s done yet. Growl will also make a sound when it displays the notification, so you can grab your flash drive the instant it’s done and go home. Growl is a separate application you have to install, though, so there is a bit of extra prep you need to do before this action will be available inside Automator.

      Growl (Leopard)

      Make your Growl notification "Sticky" if you want the notification to remain on screen until you click on it.

And that’s it. After Automator finishes, you’ll have a backup copy of your project on both your local Avid drive, and your flash drive. You should then take your flash drive home with you every night, so that your backup copies are in separate places. I also keep an archive of every zip file I make on an external hard drive. Most of the time you won’t need this, but sometimes it’s useful to be able to go back a few days or months in your project’s history.

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