Use a Droplet to Prep Audio for FCP

Use a Droplet to Prep Audio for FCP

So I’ve had a chance to work for a while on FCP, and I have a few things in mind to post on it. First, though, a very simple trick to help with importing properly configured audio into FCP.

The Issue

FCP, like Avid, prefers uncompressed audio over MP3s, M4As, etc. It’s not that it doesn’t work when you import a MP3 into FCP, it just doesn’t work well. You’ll hear all sorts of clicks and dropouts as you play through the track, so to prevent this you need to convert your audio to WAV or AIF before you import. There is a program called Loader that will convert your audio for you, copy it to a specified folder, and then import it, but it costs $79. The other way you can do two out of those three actions (converting, copying to a specified folder) is to make a Compressor droplet. You still have to import it on your own, but to save $79 I think that’s a pretty good trade-off.

Compressor Droplets

Any compression setting in Compressor can be converted into a standalone application called a Droplet. As you might infer, you can drop things like files onto the Droplet, and it will then process that file into whatever setting the Droplet is programmed with. You can also specify a destination folder for that Droplet and tell it to run silently. Each file you drop onto it will queue up and encode immediately, with the resulting file being placed in your predetermined destination folder.

For me, I have two droplets, one for Mono and one for Stereo (both 24-bit/48k AIF)

Stereo Compression Setting

The image above is for the stereo setting, from which I then make a Droplet in the Settings window:

Make a Droplet

Once you click the Make Droplet button, a dialog will come up asking you where you want to save the Droplet itself, as well as which Destination (defined in the Destinations tab) you’d like that Droplet to send its files to:

Saving a Droplet

Once you click Save, your Droplet will appear wherever you saved it (on my Desktop in my case), and you can proceed to drop files onto it. The first time you run the Droplet a dialog will come up confirming your settings, and you should uncheck the “Show at Launch” checkbox in the lower left corner so that the Droplet runs silently in the future.

Once the compression is done (keeping Batch Manager handy is a good idea to check progress, though most audio takes a very short amount of time), you can import your new files into FCP and cut away.

Screenshot of the Hellboy 2 Avid Project Window

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